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20121006
20121006
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if not revolutionary which say he's written a book largely based on president obama's writing speeches and interviews. and set out to understand an explain him as he understands andings explains himself. as a result he's come to the conclusion that it turns out that liberals don't understand president obama and neither do conservatives. the result is the most serious and provocative assessment yet of modern american liberalism. "i am the change" barack obama and the crisis of liberalism. this is a bock that should, i believe will transform the left and the right understanding of modern liberalism, how we look at the past, the present, and as we shall see its future. so suppose join me in wrking a dear friend of the heritage and a dear frefned mine and my teachers chaster charles kesler. >> [applause] thank you. they would have properly discounted your warm praise of me if you mentioned you were my student at the beginning instead of at the end. it is a always a pleasure to be here. matt's stewardship of the american studies here has been stellar. and it's heritage now speaks out on a variety of philo
, the american recovery reinvestment act signed into law by president obama on february 17, 2009. this is about 50 minutes. [applause] >> thanks, all of you, for coming and braving the rain. i am thrilled to start by 4 in new york. my wonderful parents are here. the only new yorkers who go to florida to visit their grandchildren. there are a lot of facts and figures and fun characters and colorful stories. i knew it was going to be controversial and it would be revisionist history of the obama stimulus and everybody hates the obama stimulus. obama he did too. a year after it passed a percentage of americans who believe the stimulus created jobs was lower than the percentage of americans who believe elvis was alive. at one point i told the story how obama told his cabinet that the stimulus was the only thing less popular than he was. when you put the words change and obama this close together you are going to get yelled at. the new -- "the new new deal," right wingers the text of the old new deal and left wingers don't think this spineless sellout of a president is fit to share a book jacket wit
obama for the same topic. >> when you give speeches and he says people ask him what is your most memorable part of your career he says i would have to say that other people think the most memorable part of my career is the baseball scandal. those records are not here. he was involved in the red cross fund distributions because he was working in the capacity of those organizations so they apply in other places. the congressional papers end up with congressional records, too and they have to create the institutions if they want to pull the whole picture together. >> coverage continues here on booktv. >> we are in our public reading room. we of patrons doing genealogical research and personal computers and looking for good works and we are going into these main authors collection and in the early 1920's henry is the state librarian at the time started collecting books by the writers trying to get them signed whenever possible, and it's grown into this. in fact we also have an annex to this room but we have thousands of titles by writers that have some connection to the state of main
after president barack obama had been inaugurated as president and another man that has attacked us came to the congressional office here on capitol hill and said i'm one of the people that beat you. will you forgive me? i want to apologize. his son had been encouraging to see killed the people that he had attacked. i said yes i accept your apology. i forgive you. his son started crying and he started crying, i started crying. he gave me a hug and i hugged him back. i have seen him three of her times. he called me brother and i called him brother. that is what the movement was about, reconciliation. this book is about reconciliation. [applause] we are one people, we are one family, we are one house. we must be reconciled. of those of us who live here in america, those of us who live here on this piece of real estate were born to live together as brothers and sisters. the late a. philip randolph, who was the dean of the civil rights movement and black leadership, who had of the idea about the march on washington almost 50 years ago said from time to time may be our mothers and fathers all
structure. [applause] >> president barack obama would be the first to acknowledge that is rapidly rising star was hitched to paul jennings and to untold number of other african americans whose stories may never be known but who like jennings overcame a barrage of obstacles to rise. it has been said there is nothing truly new in this world but the history that we have yet to learn. thank you so much. [applause] >> turning to the early part of your book. when doing your research define any conversations between madison and his predecessor jefferson? they were neighbors and in terms of the slaves, they talk about things you spoke about. you find forces where they conversed and shared their ideas? >> i don't know that i found any firsthand conversations between the two of them on this subject. i can tell you that they had very similar views about it. they understood that slavery was immoral. and abominable crime, jefferson called it. madison said that it was a moral, economical and social evil. jefferson acknowledged that if it ever came down to a war between slaves and slave owners there wa
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5